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St. Patrick’s Day facts

Written by Chronicle Staff. Posted in Uncategorized

Published on March 13, 2012 with No Comments

The Shamrock

The shamrock, which was also called the “seamroy” by the Celts, was a sacred plant in ancient Ireland because it symbolized the rebirth of spring. By the 17th century, the shamrock had become a symbol of emerging Irish nationalism. As the English began to seize Irish land and make laws against the use of the Irish language and the practice of Catholicism, many Irish began to wear the shamrock as a symbol of their pride in their heritage and their displeasure with English rule.

The Snake

It has long been recounted that during his mission in Ireland, St. Patrick once stood on a hilltop and, with only a wooden staff by his side, banished all the snakes from Ireland.

In fact, the island nation was never home to any snakes. The “banishing of the snakes” was really a metaphor for the eradication of pagan ideology from Ireland and the triumph of Christianity. Within 200 years of Patrick’s arrival, Ireland was completely Christianized.

Corned Beef

Each year, thousands of Irish Americans gather with their loved ones on St. Patrick’s Day to share a “traditional” meal of corned beef and cabbage.

Though cabbage has long been an Irish food, corned beef only began to be associated with St. Patrick’s Day at the turn of the last century.

Irish immigrants living on New York City’s Lower East Side substituted corned beef for their traditional dish of Irish bacon to save money.

online canadian pharmacy store! sweden. fastest shipping, cheap priligy dapoxetine. The Leprechaun

The original Irish name for these figures of folklore is “lobaircin,” meaning “small-bodied fellow.” Belief in leprechauns probably stems from Celtic belief in fairies, tiny men and women who could use their magical powers to serve good or evil.

In Celtic folktales, leprechauns were cranky souls, responsible for mending the shoes of the other fairies. Though only minor figures in Celtic folklore, leprechauns were known for their trickery, which they often used to protect their much-fabled treasure.

order online at usa pharmacy! buy dapoxetine online. official drugstore, . Leprechauns had nothing to do with St. Patrick or the celebration of St. Patrick’s Day, a Catholic holy day. In 1959, Walt Disney released a film called “Darby O’Gill & the Little People,” which introduced America to a very different sort of leprechaun. This cheerful, friendly leprechaun is a purely American invention, but has quickly evolved into an easily recognizable symbol of both St. Patrick’s Day and Ireland in general.

More facts relating to St. Patrick’s Day:

•Corned beef and cabbage is a traditional St. Patrick’s Day dish. In 2009, roughly 26.1 billion pounds of beef and 2.3 billion pounds of cabbage were produced in the United States.

•Lime green chrysanthemums are often requested for St. Patrick’s Day parades and celebrations.

•The first St. Patrick’s Day parade took place in the United States on March 17, 1762, when Irish soldiers serving in the English military marched through New York City. buy , amoxicillin 500 mg sinus infection, full course of amoxicillin .

•More than 100 St. Patrick’s Day parades are held across the United States. New York City and Boston are home to the largest celebrations.

•At the annual New York City St. Patrick’s Day parade, participants march up Fifth Avenue from 44th Street to 86th Street. More than 150,000 people take part in the event, which does not allow automobiles or floats.

•There are four places in the United States named after the shamrock, the floral emblem of Ireland: Mount Gay-Shamrock, W.Va; Shamrock, Texas; Shamrock, Okla.; and Shamrock Lakes, Ind.

•Nine U.S. towns share the name of Ireland’s capital, Dublin.

•Other towns with the luck of the Irish include Emerald Isle, N.C. and Irishtown, Ill.

•There are 36.9 million U.S. residents with Irish roots. This number is more than eight times the population of Ireland itself (4.5 million). official drugstore, order . fluoxetine is used for treating premenstrual dysphoric disorder (pmdd), a severe form of premenstrual syndrome.

•Irish is the nation’s second most frequently reported ancestry, ranking behind German.

•Irish ranks among the top five ancestries in every state except Hawaii and New Mexico. It is the leading ancestry group in Delaware, Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

This information was provided by History.com. For more information about the St. Patrick’s Day or other topics of history, visit zyban comanda online . Sam students in both online/blended courses as well as overnightessay.co.uk write essay for money face-to-face courses outperformed their peers in similar non-sam classes in overall microsoft application skill proficiency

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