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Heat Expected Over Next Few Days; – EMS Professional Says to Limit Risk, Take Precautions

Written by Chronicle Staff. Posted in Uncategorized

Published on July 06, 2016 with No Comments

 

Emergency medical professionals with the Indiana Department of Homeland Security are encouraging Hoosiers to take heat-safety precautions.

“Excessive exposure to temperatures above 90 degrees increases the risk of heat-induced illnesses, such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke,” said Dr. Michael Olinger, State Emergency Medical Services Director. “These can be life-threatening conditions, and Hoosiers should take precautions to protect themselves and their families.”

Heat exhaustion occurs when a person can’t replenish the amount of hydration lost during extended periods of sweating. Heat stroke occurs when a person’s internal temperature regulation system fails.

Dr. Olinger suggested that Hoosiers be aware of heat-illness symptoms, know how to prevent such problems, and take action right away if problems occur.

Prevent Heat Problems:

  • • Water: Drink plenty of water. Avoid carbonated or alcoholic beverages.
  • • Rest: Take frequent breaks during outdoor activities, and try to avoid activities during the hottest part of the day.
  • • Shade: Stay indoors to limit exposure to the sun. Check on family, friends, and neighbors who do not have air conditioning and who spend much of their time alone.

Watch for Symptoms:

  • Dizziness, nausea, fatigue;
  • • Cool, clammy or flushed skin;
  • • Profuse sweating;
  • • Raised body temperature;
  • • Muscle cramps.

Act Quickly if Heat Illness is Suspected:

  • • Don’t hesitate to call 911;
  • • Use ice packs or cold wash cloths to help bring down body temperatures;
  • • Provide non-carbonated sports drinks when available;
  • • Provide drinking water;
  • • Move people to cooler areas and have them rest.

Help Pets:

  • • Bring pets inside during hot weather (some local laws may even require it);
  • • Make sure pets have plenty of water;
  • • Don’t leave pets in vehicles, even for a minute.

For more heat safety tips, visit .

 

Easy Options for Sun Protection

Summer is here! Who doesn’t want to be outside, sunbathing, swimming, playing catch on the beach or just barbequing in the backyard? While summer means fun in the sun, make sure you’re not getting too much of a good thing. Avoid consequences of overexposure to the sun like sunburns, premature aging of the skin, wrinkling, and skin cancer, including melanoma by practicing proper sun protection. The hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. daylight savings time (9 a.m. to 3 p.m. standard time) are the most hazardous for UV exposure in the continental United States. UV rays are the greatest during the late spring and early summer in North America.Sunscreen

• Use sunscreen with sun protective factor (SPF) 15 or higher, and both UVA and UVB protection.

• Sunscreen wears off. Put it on again if you stay out in the sun for more than two hours, and after you swim or do things that make you sweat.

• Check the sunscreen’s expiration date. Sunscreen without an expiration date has a shelf life of no more than three years, but its shelf life is shorter if it.

• Wear a hat with a wide brim to shade the face, head, ears, and neck.

• For the most protection, wear a hat with a brim all the way around that shades your face, ears, and the back of your neck. A tightly woven fabric, such as canvas, works best to protect your skin from UV rays. Avoid straw hats with holes that let sunlight through. A darker hat may offer more UV protection.

• If you wear a baseball cap, you should also protect your ears and the back of your neck by wearing clothing that covers those areas, using sunscreen with at least SPF 15, or by staying in the shade. For more information, visit . It’s my audit here great for a quick sketch or a more detailed painting

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