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Community Hospital offers advanced pulmonary diagnosis technology

Written by Chronicle Staff. Posted in Community News, Community News & People in the News, Featured

Published on August 26, 2020 with No Comments

With robotic bronchoscopy, the surgeon has precise control and stability over the controller tool making it easier to reach nodules deep in the lung. Using a combination of real-time visualization and electromagnetic navigation (similar to GPS) the pulmonologist has a direct roadmap to locate the nodule.

Waiting to hear if you have lung cancer no doubt brings up feelings of apprehension, worry and fear. Pulmonologists on staff at the hospitals of Community Healthcare System are using new technology to help ease the wait after lung biopsy and find answers sooner.

Community Hospital is fourth in the state of Indiana to use the Monarch Bronchoscopy robotic procedure to detect, diagnose and stage lung cancer. The robotic bronchoscope is designed to keep the lung biopsy procedure as minimally invasive as possible making it easier to reach nodules deep in the lung without making any incisions.

“The Monarch platform is a new technology that helps us reach farther to obtain a tissue biopsy from nodules located anywhere in the lungs and from areas that previously were deemed to be unreachable by conventional methods,” said Pulmonologist Dr. Fadi Layous, on staff at Community Hospital, St. Catherine Hospital and St. Mary Medical Center. “Our patients benefit from a more accurate diagnostic tool which allows us to pinpoint diagnosis and help to offer the right treatment, sooner.”

Traditionally, flexible bronchoscopy has been used to diagnose lung disease, but has navigation limitations and a higher risk of bleeding and complications. When controlled manually, the brochoscope is able to reach only 14 percent of lesions (abnormal tissue) smaller than 2 centimeters in the outer areas of the lung. Additional surgical procedures would be necessary to make a diagnosis if the lesion on the lung was deeper in the lung tissue and out of the reach of the bronchoscope.

With robotic bronchoscopy, the surgeon has precise control and stability over the controller tool making it easier to reach nodules deep in the lung. Using a combination of real-time visualization and electromagnetic navigation (similar to GPS) the pulmonologist has a direct roadmap to locate the nodule. He can quickly and safely obtain a biopsy of the nodule and send it off to the laboratory for testing.

“Using the robotic bronchoscopy, the physician is in control of the robotic arms that provide greater stability when navigating through the airways of the lungs during a biopsy procedure,” Layous said. “We are able to see further into the lungs than before with the tiny camera that gives peripheral vision into the airways. As far as reachability and control, the telescopic bronchoscope allows us to reach the outermost portions of the lungs while maintaining stability at all times.”

The entire procedure takes from 30 to 90 minutes. It is done on an outpatient basis.

Robotic bronchoscopy when used in conjunction with endobronchial ultrasound or EBUS, offers a minimally invasive way to stage cancer and see if the cancer has spread. This method helps doctors determine the appropriate treatment.

EBUS allows physicians to perform a technique known as transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) to obtain tissue or fluid samples from the lungs and surrounding lymph nodes without surgery. The samples can be used for diagnosing and staging lung cancer, detecting infections and identifying inflammatory diseases that affect the lungs.

For more information about robotic bronchoscopy and lung cancer care at the hospitals of Community Healthcare System, visit COMHS.org.

 

 

 

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