What's Your Bone Health IQ?

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Published on August 18, 2010 with No Comments

What you don’t know about bone health can hurt you. Take this test – and learn how to improve your lifestyle in ways that benefit your bones.

1. True or False: Being overweight increases your risk for osteoporosis.

2. True or False: You can have osteoporosis right now and not even know it.

3. True or False: Past the age of 30, there isn’t anything you can do to improve your bone health.

4. True or False: If I get enough calcium, I’m doing all I can diet-wise to benefit my bone health.

5. True or False: It doesn’t matter what sort of exercise you do: all sorts swimming, biking, rowing and walking—benefit bone health equally.

Bone Health Quiz Answers

1. True or False: Being overweight increases your risk for osteoporosis.

Answer: False. Carrying around extra pounds raises the risk for a long list of chronic health conditions – heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure, just to name a few – but osteoporosis isn’t one of them. Being underweight, however, puts you at risk for thinning bones. Stay in the “just right” weight zone (not too low, not too high) by eating a healthful diet that provides an appropriate number of calories for your lifestyle.

2. True or False: You can have osteoporosis right now and not even know it.

Answer: True. Osteoporosis is called a “silent disease” because it often has no outward signs. You may not know that you have osteoporosis until a strain, bump or fall causes a bone to break. Maximize bone health by eating a calcium- and vitamin D-rich diet that contains plenty of produce. Exercise regularly. Talk with your health-care provider about whether you could benefit from a bone-density test.

3. True or False: Past the age of 30, there isn’t anything you can do to improve your bone health.

Answer: False. Bones are living tissue that are constantly breaking down and building back up. While most of the gain in bone mass happens during your teens and continues through your early twenties, it’s never too late to start taking steps to help prevent osteoporosis. Studies have shown that women in their sixties and seventies can gain some bone through diet and exercising.

4. True or False: If I get enough calcium, I’m doing all I can diet-wise to benefit my bone health.

Answer: False. Meeting the recommended intakes for calcium is an important strategy for maximizing your bone health, but it’s crucial to get enough vitamin D too. What’s more, emerging research suggests that other nutrients, including vitamin K, potassium, phosphorus and magnesium, may play integral roles in maintaining strong bones. The best way to get your fill of these nutrients is by eating plenty of fruits and vegetables. (Hint: Most leafy greens provide good amounts of all three of these nutrients.)

5. True or False: It doesn’t matter what sort of exercise you do: all sorts swimming, biking, rowing and walking – benefit bone health equally.

Answer: False. From an overall health standpoint, all exercise is beneficial, but the best physical activity for your bones is weight-bearing exercise, such as walking, dancing, jogging, stair-climbing or weightlifting. When you jump, run or lift a weight, it puts stress on your bones, which sends a signal to your body that new cells need to be added to strengthen your bones.

Story contributed by Life Line Screening of America. For more information and additional health topics visit www.lifelinescreening.com

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